GUVI Biblio





Notice:

  • Clicking on the title will open a new window with all details of the bibliographic entry.
  • Clicking on the DOI link will open a new window with the original bibliographic entry from the publisher.
  • Clicking on a single author will show all publications by the selected author.
  • Clicking on a single keyword, will show all publications by the selected keyword.



Found 7 entries in the Bibliography.


Showing entries from 1 through 7


2020

Modeling the Impact of Metallic Ion Layers on Equatorial Spread With SAMI3/ESF

The impact of urn:x-wiley:grl:media:grl60258:grl60258-math-0005 region metal ion layers on the development of equatorial plasma bubbles is investigated using the SAMI3/ESF model. We find that metal ion layers reduce the growth rate of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability (GRTI) and act to suppress the development of equatorial plasma bubbles. This is consistent with ...

Huba, J.; Krall, J.; Drob, D.;

YEAR: 2020     DOI: 10.1029/2020GL087224

Equatorial ionosphere; Equatorial Spread F; metal ions; sporadic E

2013

Thermospheric tidal effects on the ionospheric midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly using SAMI3 and TIEGCM

This paper is the first study to employ a three-dimensional physics-based ionosphere model, SAMI3, coupled with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and Global Scale Wave Model to simulate the mesospheric and lower thermospheric tidal effects on the development of midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA). Using this coupled model, the diurnal variation of MSNA electron densities at 300 km altitude is simulated on both June solstice (day ...

Chen, C.; Lin, C.; Chang, L.; Huba, J.; Lin, J.; Saito, A.; . Y. Liu, J;

YEAR: 2013     DOI: 10.1002/jgra.50340

MSNA; SAMI3; tidal effect; TIEGCM

2010

Modeling of multiple effects of atmospheric tides on the ionosphere: An examination of possible coupling mechanisms responsible for the longitudinal structure of the equatorial ionosphere

England, S.; Immel, T.; Huba, J.; Hagan, M.; Maute, A.; DeMajistre, R.;

YEAR: 2010     DOI: 10.1029/2009JA014894

Integrating the Sun-Earth System for the Operational Environment (ISES-OE)

Lean, J.; Huba, J.; McDonald, S.; Slinker, S.; Drob, D.; Emmert, J.; Meier, R.; Picone, J.; Joyce, G.; Krall, J.; Stephan, A.; Roach, K.; Knight, H.; Plunkett, S.; Wu, C.-C.; Wood, B.; Wang, Y.-M.; Howard, R.; Chen, J.; Bernhardt, P.; Fedder, J.;

YEAR: 2010     DOI:

2009

Day-to-day variability of the equatorial ionization anomaly and scintillations at dusk observed by GUVI and modeling by SAMI3

Basu, Su.; Basu, S.; Huba, J.; Krall, J.; McDonald, S.; Makela, J.; Miller, E.; Ray, S.; Groves, K.;

YEAR: 2009     DOI: 10.1029/2008JA013899

Three-dimensional equatorial spread F modeling: Zonal neutral wind effects

Huba, J.; Ossakow, S.; Joyce, G.; Krall, J.; England, S.;

YEAR: 2009     DOI: 10.1029/2009GL040284

2005

The October 28, 2003 extreme EUV solar flare and resultant extreme ionospheric effects: Comparison to other Halloween events and the Bastille Day event

Some of the most intense solar flares measured in 0.1 to 0.8 nm x-rays in recent history occurred near the end of 2003. The Nov 4 event is the largest in the NOAA records (X28) and the Oct 28 flare was the fourth most intense (X17). The Oct 29 flare was class X7. These flares are compared and contrasted to the July 14, 2000 Bastille Day (X10) event using the SOHO SEM 26.0 to 34.0 nm EUV and TIMED SEE 0.1\textendash194 nm data. High time resolution, \~30s ground-base GPS data and the GUVI FUV dayglow data are used to exami ...

Tsurutani, B.; Judge, D.; Guarnieri, F.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Jones, A.; Nuttall, J.; Zambon, G.A.; Didkovsky, L.; Mannucci, A.J.; Iijima, B.; Meier, R.; Immel, T.J.; Woods, T.; Prasad, S.; Floyd, L.; Huba, J.; Solomon, S.; Straus, P.; Viereck, R.;

YEAR: 2005     DOI: 10.1029/2004GL021475



  1