GUVI Biblio





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Found 5 entries in the Bibliography.


Showing entries from 1 through 5


2012

Bright polar mesospheric clouds formed by main engine exhaust from the space shuttle\textquoterights final launch

Stevens, Michael; Lossow, Stefan; Fiedler, Jens; Baumgarten, Gerd; ├╝bken, Franz-Josef; Hallgren, Kristofer; Hartogh, Paul; Randall, Cora; Lumpe, Jerry; Bailey, Scott; Niciejewski, R.; Meier, R.; Plane, John; Kochenash, Andrew; Murtagh, Donal; Englert, Christoph;

Published by: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres      Published on: Apr-10-2013

YEAR: 2012     DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017638

2011

A study of space shuttle plumes in the lower thermosphere

Meier, R.; Stevens, Michael; Plane, John; Emmert, J.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, I.; Paxton, L.; Christensen, A.;

Published by: Journal of Geophysical Research      Published on: Jan-01-2011

YEAR: 2011     DOI: 10.1029/2011JA016987

2010

Can molecular diffusion explain Space Shuttle plume spreading?

Meier, R.; Plane, John; Stevens, Michael; Paxton, L.; Christensen, A.; Crowley, G.;

Published by: Geophysical Research Letters      Published on: Jan-04-2010

YEAR: 2010     DOI: 10.1029/2010GL042868

Radar, lidar, and optical observations in the polar summer mesosphere shortly after a space shuttle launch

Kelley, M.; Nicolls, M.; Varney, R.; Collins, R.; Doe, R.; Plane, J.; Thayer, J.; Taylor, M.; Thurairajah, B.; Mizutani, K.;

Published by: Journal of Geophysical Research      Published on: Jan-01-2010

YEAR: 2010     DOI: 10.1029/2009JA014938

2005

Antarctic mesospheric clouds formed from space shuttle exhaust

New satellite observations reveal lower thermospheric transport of a space shuttle exhaust plume into the southern hemisphere two days after a January, 2003 launch. A day later, ground-based lidar observations in Antarctica identify iron ablated from the shuttle\textquoterights main engines. Additional satellite observations of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) show a burst that constitutes 10\textendash20\% of the PMC mass between 65\textendash79\textdegreeS during the 2002\textendash2003 season, comparable to previous res ...

Stevens, Michael; Meier, R.; Chu, X.; DeLand, M.; Plane, J.;

Published by: Geophysical Research Letters      Published on: 07/2005

YEAR: 2005     DOI: 10.1029/2005GL023054



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